• Lee, spreading compost
    May 21, 2014 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    To fertilize or not to fertilize?

    There are times when even compost needs a kickstart Looking out on my vegetable garden last week, I noticed some yellowing leaves on kale transplants. Perhaps the yellowing leaves were just a legacy…

  • Tomato packets
    April 9, 2014 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    A wealth of heirlooms

    Pest problems, due mostly to having a poor site and living east of the Rocky Mountains, have made me give up on growing apples – almost. Last year’s cicadas and this winter’s deer…

  • Lee in the act of Mulchercising
    December 11, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Getting buff by buffering soil

    Who needs a health club when you can be shoveling mulch? I’m getting a lot of mulchercise here at the farmden these days. It’s good for me and good for the ground and,…

  • Ken Greene and Doug Muller of the Hudson Valley Seed Library in Accord
    November 6, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    The borrowers afield

    Rare heirloom varieties preserved thanks to the Hudson Valley Seed Library Finally, after many years, I made it to the library. No, not the book library; the seed library – the Hudson Valley…

  • 34 Plum appointment
    August 21, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Plum appointment

    It’s a rare good year for these fickle fruits Whoosh! Summer is speeding past. Cicadas have come and gone. Same goes for Japanese beetles. Temperatures have cooled dramatically. And now it’s raining plums….

  • 32 It was a very odd year
    August 7, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    It was a very odd year

    Cicadas overstayed their welcome, while other bugs made a hasty exit Two plants have been disappointments this year. Goji berry (Lycium barbarum), the first, has been touted as a wonder food, effective for…

  • Photo by Lee Riech.
    August 1, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Patches of bright green

    Trials and tribulations of a nice lawn The plants I grow best are generally the ones that I like the most. I’m not good at growing grass (lawngrass, that is; more on the…

  • Randy Parmer and Rachel Sather. Photo by Mookie Forcella.
    July 24, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Growing strong

    Gardens for Nutrition in New Paltz still thriving after 37 years, hurricanes and floods On the floodplain of the Wallkill River, just off Huguenot Street in the Village of New Paltz, lies a…

  • Phylostachys, flowering shoot. Photo by Lee Reich.
    July 24, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Oh, shoot!

    Flowering bamboo can come after decades Flowering is desirable in some garden plants (fruit trees, broccoli, and, of course, flowers) and undesirable in others (lettuce, cabbage, and arugula). I’m not sure how I…

  • Teri Condon’s garden (photo by Ken Garcens and Terry Decker).
    July 22, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    In full flower

    Garden Conservancy’s 2013 Open Days program Some of the finest public gardens were actually started as private labors of love. Perhaps the best-known example is Claude Monet’s garden at Giverny. He created it to provide…

  • Japanese beetle. Photo by Scott Robinson.
    July 18, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Meet the beetles

    It’s time to start picking them off in the early morning Just as cicadas are returning to their underground homes, Japanese beetles are emerging from these same quarters. (Do they nod to each…

  • Photo by Will Dendis
    July 15, 2013 · 0 Comments · Featured, Lawn & Garden

    Master Gardener Cheryl Alloway

    Cheryl Alloway of Tillson is one of about 80 volunteer Master Gardeners in Ulster County trained by Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) to provide the public with gardening expertise. While acknowledging that the connotations…

  • Photo by Luis Perez

    Bringing the outdoors in

    “I am two with nature.” -Woody Allen   Whether you’re nervous about embarking on a full-on garden, or you can’t get enough and just have to bring the outdoors in, here are some…

  • Cicadas on a pear tree. (photo by Lee Reich | Almanac Weekly)
    July 4, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Resistance is futile!

    “It takes a patient man to net an acre of blueberries.” The New England accent added weight to the declaration, as did the gentleman’s 80-something-year-old frame standing ramrod-straight and adorned with checkered jacket,…

  • David Austin rose, L. D. Braithwaite (photo by Lee Reich | Almanac Weekly)
    June 27, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Not my cup of hybrid tea

    Perhaps it was youthful rebelliousness, but for years – for decades – I lambasted my father’s roses. The roses reared up their colorful heads on the other side of the low, clipped privet…

  • Use natural materials for planters. (photo by Will Dendis)

    New lease on life

    When recent hurricanes devastated the area, many homes and ecosystems were left permanently altered. Some residents saw opportunities in the aftermath to re-purpose something discarded. When disaster strikes, don’t panic! Instead, use these…

  • Photo by Sam Beebe, Ecotrust
    June 20, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Here we go round the mulberry trees

    I’ve been a fruit nut for a long time, and throughout that time have had a particular attraction to uncommon fruits (about which I wrote a book). Evidence of the latter began with the…

  • A pH testing kit from Cornell Cooperative Extension. (photo by Will Dendis

    Top tips from the Master Gardeners

    Master Gardeners are trained volunteers who receive research-based instruction on horticulture from Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) and share that knowledge with the public through a variety of activities. Volunteers commit to giving at…

  • June 13, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Let us spray

    Anyone visiting my garden a few days ago might have thought that they happened upon a Moon landing or an extraplanetary explorer. A two-legged creature was wandering around in bright blue pants and…

  • Clematis Nelly Moser (left) and child (right). (photo by Lee Reich)
    June 6, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    A vine madness

    Letting a few clematis plants grow is the closest that I’ve come to playing the lottery. It looks like I’ve won, judging from the first flower that opened last week. Let me explain….

  • Andirons by Woodstock artist Eugenie Gershoy. (photo by Will Dendis)
    June 3, 2013 · 0 Comments · Helpful Hints

    A sense of where you are

    “That’s a New York State leg,” says Tom Luciano, proprietor of Time and Materials, one of Hudson’s many antique shops. We’re sitting in a cafe in Phoenicia, and he’s pointing across the room…

  • Now’s the time to start germinating seeds for autumnal veggies like radishes. (photo by Dion Ogust)
    May 30, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Heading for a fall

    Time to jump into the future again: It’s autumn of this year, and tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and other summer delicacies are on the wane. Does the vegetable garden appear melancholy and forlorn? No!…

  • A Woodstock home was transformed through creative use of existing space.

    Space must flow

    Good design transforms even uninspired architecture, converting dark, claustrophobic rooms into an open plan where space flows harmoniously, for example. It can reinvigorate a dead space, such as a front door entrance never…

  • Clockwise from top-left: glass, metal, faux-wood and patterned ceramic.

    Hip to be square

    The most effective way to make a bold visual statement in your kitchen or bath is through the use of tile. In the same way that fabrics add that splash of color and…

  • Collector Tom Pfeffer is the owner of Kingston’s Jacob Ten Broeck House. (photo by Will Dendis)
    May 20, 2013 · 0 Comments · Home Spotlight

    A little of everything

    If real-estate investor Tom Pfeffer had been born in England a century ago instead of in Illinois in the late 1950s, he might have been termed “a celebrated gentleman naturalist and collector of…

  • Lee turning one of his compost bins.

    Turning over an old leaf

    You’d think, this time of year, that all I’d be doing is sowing seeds and transplanting small and large plants. I am. But I’m also turning compost piles, getting ready to use that…

  • home
    May 13, 2013 · 0 Comments · Real Estate

    Financing the American Dream

    When the housing bubble burst, the free-flowing money used to finance a home shut down to a trickle. After a few wild years where many companies encouraged buyers to stretch their definition of…

  • Sheets and bedspreads make great curtains, as demonstrated by this bedspread repurposed as a sumptuous swag.

    Revive a room

    Spring is a time of new beginnings. Many of us are yearning for a new look—be it a new hair style, outfit, or living room. Regarding the latter, a simple arrangement of furniture…

  • apricots
    April 18, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    A fruitless pursuit?

    What a fool I am; I can’t even follow my own advice! A couple of days ago I planted an apricot tree that I had ordered a few weeks previously – all of…

  • Photo by Dion Ogust
    April 15, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Holy tomato!

    Sowing tomatoes was the big moment in the garden last week. The sowing was actually indoors, and it was on April 1, which is six weeks before the “average date of the last…

  • Besides its ease of growth and longevity, kale packs a powerhouse of nutrients.
    April 11, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Green that keeps giving

    The season’s first peas and potatoes are such a taste treat; radishes are fun; and everyone pines for the first tomatoes. But kale, I think, is the vegetable most worthy of praise. Here…

  • You can save the seeds from heirloom vegetables and flowers and they’ll produce true-to-seed the next year, unlike the hybrids. (photo by Steven Depolo)

    Fresh ideas for spring

    It’s time to treat our winter-weary eyes to some lush greenery and colorful blooms, maybe even grow a vegetable or two, or at least pot some fresh herbs for the kitchen windowsill. For…

  • Typically, the ratio of sap to finished syrup is 40-to-1. (photo by Lee Reich/Almanac Weekly)
    March 28, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Tap that sap

    Time is running out to finish pruning my kiwi and grapevines, apple, pear, cornelian cherry, filbert and chestnut trees, rose, gooseberry, currant, blueberry, raspberry, blackberry, yew and fothergilla bushes. Now that I list…

  • Insulating shades are designed to replace venetian blinds with a fabric made of bonded polyester, structured with cells that trap air.

    Bang for your buck

    Light bulbs Replacing conventional incandescent light bulbs with their energy-efficient successors is a simple way to save money. The dilemma is whether to choose LED (light-emitting diodes) or CFL (compact fluorescent lighting). LEDs…

  • Sarcococca, also known as sweet box.
    March 22, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Philahortica

    Philadelphia should not be called the “City of Brotherly Love.” No, I didn’t get mugged on a recent trip there. It’s just that more evident – to me, at least – is Philadelphia’s…

  • Seedlings in re-purposed toilet paper rolls.
    March 18, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    A time to plant

    There must be a converse to the saying, “Be careful what you wish for…” and if there is, I’ve realized it. I wrote, a couple of weeks ago, about the so-called hardy orange,…

  • Honeyberry (Lonicera edulis)
    March 14, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Something new

    Two or three people have already asked me, “Are you growing anything special this year?” Each time I had to stop and think: “Am I?” Then I feel, “Yes, I should be growing…

  • Save the date: The Mid-Hudson Orchid Society’s Spring Orchid Show & Sale takes place on Sat., March 9 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Union Presbyterian Church, located at 44 Balmville Road in Newburgh. Experts will be there to answer questions, and education for beginners starts at 1 p.m. (photo by Lucia O’Corozine, Almanac Weekly)
    February 28, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Ramping it up

    Spring is here, in my basement. Allow me to set the scene: My basement is barely heated, and I replaced what once was a south-facing Bilco door with a wooden frame supporting two…

  • Photo by Darwin Bell
    February 21, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Pungent progeny

    The official start for this year’s growing season, which I count as the day when I sow my first vegetable seeds, will begin momentarily. Actually, the season should have already been underway, as…

  • Interior of a Catskill Farms’ home.
    February 18, 2013 · 0 Comments · Real Estate

    Rustic without the rust

    Charles Petersheim didn’t know a soul in the Catskills when he left New York City post-9/11 and purchased an abandoned shack in Sullivan County. Petersheim, who had done construction and real estate in…

  • Image from the National Agricultural Library
    February 14, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Don’t run out of impatiens

    You perhaps missed last summer’s plant plague, which might be back this summer. My garden was spared because last summer I happened not to have planted the particular host plant: impatiens (Impatiens walleriana),…

  • garden
    February 7, 2013 · 0 Comments · Lawn & Garden

    Unnatural selection

    Some inch-long, tapering white sprouts – roots – caused quite a stir today, for me at least. The first was spotted inside a baggie of moist potting soil that I put in the…

Latest entries
Lee, spreading compost

To fertilize or not to fertilize?

There are times when even compost needs a kickstart Looking out on my vegetable garden last week, I noticed some yellowing leaves on kale transplants. Perhaps the yellowing leaves were just a legacy…

Tomato packets

A wealth of heirlooms

Pest problems, due mostly to having a poor site and living east of the Rocky Mountains, have made me give up on growing apples – almost. Last year’s cicadas and this winter’s deer…

Lee in the act of Mulchercising

Getting buff by buffering soil

Who needs a health club when you can be shoveling mulch? I’m getting a lot of mulchercise here at the farmden these days. It’s good for me and good for the ground and,…

Ken Greene and Doug Muller of the Hudson Valley Seed Library in Accord

The borrowers afield

Rare heirloom varieties preserved thanks to the Hudson Valley Seed Library Finally, after many years, I made it to the library. No, not the book library; the seed library – the Hudson Valley…

34 Plum appointment

Plum appointment

It’s a rare good year for these fickle fruits Whoosh! Summer is speeding past. Cicadas have come and gone. Same goes for Japanese beetles. Temperatures have cooled dramatically. And now it’s raining plums….

32 It was a very odd year

It was a very odd year

Cicadas overstayed their welcome, while other bugs made a hasty exit Two plants have been disappointments this year. Goji berry (Lycium barbarum), the first, has been touted as a wonder food, effective for…

Photo by Lee Riech.

Patches of bright green

Trials and tribulations of a nice lawn The plants I grow best are generally the ones that I like the most. I’m not good at growing grass (lawngrass, that is; more on the…

Randy Parmer and Rachel Sather. Photo by Mookie Forcella.

Growing strong

Gardens for Nutrition in New Paltz still thriving after 37 years, hurricanes and floods On the floodplain of the Wallkill River, just off Huguenot Street in the Village of New Paltz, lies a…

Phylostachys, flowering shoot. Photo by Lee Reich.

Oh, shoot!

Flowering bamboo can come after decades Flowering is desirable in some garden plants (fruit trees, broccoli, and, of course, flowers) and undesirable in others (lettuce, cabbage, and arugula). I’m not sure how I…

Teri Condon’s garden (photo by Ken Garcens and Terry Decker).

In full flower

Garden Conservancy’s 2013 Open Days program Some of the finest public gardens were actually started as private labors of love. Perhaps the best-known example is Claude Monet’s garden at Giverny. He created it to provide…

Home Hudson Valley © 2014 All Rights Reserved

Powered by WordPress